Questions.

They’re as old as time itself, and yet many of us allow their full potential to fall flat on its face.

For most of us questions have become mundane, mediocre and routine expressions whose best uses are to help us locate lost items (“Has anyone seen my keys?), frustrate our teams (Why can’t you work with this budget?), or worse, talk down to ourselves (Why can’t I get it right?).

But questions can be powerful forces for mindset and behavior change if we let them.

There Are No Stupid Questions, Right?

I bet that when you were in school your teacher probably told you that there were no such things as stupid questions, which may not be entirely true.

You’ve got a super-efficient brain that goes to work to try to answer any question it’s given, but that’s only beneficial if you give your brain empowering questions to contemplate.

One of my favorite coaches, Tony Robbins, likes to say, “Ask a stupid question, get a stupid answer,” and considering most of us ask the same uninspiring questions day in and day out, the answers we get back may be about as empowering as training wheels on a speedboat.

Not very, if you ask me.

Flip the Script

And while many routine questions may seem harmless in their posing, when it comes to the subject of social work salaries, income, and money, the danger of asking stupid questions is more of the same low wages and undervalued service – and no social worker that I know wants more of that!

So what can social workers do to begin to  improve their thinking around money and their income in the process?  Why, ask better questions, of course!

Not only will asking empowering questions force your brain to reveal to you more empowering answers, your answers may even revel to you how you might earn more money in the process.

Yeah, you!

Not sure what questions to ask? Don’t worry; I got you covered with 69 empowering questions you can ask yourself or a colleague to help you get started. My best advice to you is to assume that there is an answer to every question and that they all apply to you (for example, N/A is not a viable response). Use this to challenge your current thinking and help expand your mindset around what it means to be wealthy and a social worker.

The more specific you are, the better your results will be, so give yourself some time to go through the entire process and feel free to add more questions for yourself.

Ready? Go!

69 Empowering Questions to Improve Your Social Work Money Mindset

  1. What do I want for myself when it comes to the subject of money?
  2. What do I want for my family when it comes to the subject of money?
  3. What do I want for my clients when it comes to the subject of money?
  4. What messages did I hear about money when I was growing up (from family, church, community, etc.)?
  5. What messages have I heard about money from social workers?
  6. What have I heard others say about social workers as it relates to money?
  7. How have the messages I heard from these shaped my attitudes toward money?
  8. In what ways have I allowed my social work training to determine the amount of income I expect to make in my lifetime?
  9. In what ways have I promoted the idea that there is “not enough” or “lack” when it comes to money and resources?
  10. In what ways have I perpetuated the idea that a profession in social work means financial sacrifice and suffering?
  11. What trauma have I experienced in my life when it comes to money?
  12. In retrospect, how has this trauma affected me?
  13. What have I done to compensate for this trauma?
  14. What evidence do I have that I have healed (or am healing) from this trauma?
  15. What things do I say about money on a regular basis?
  16. What fears do I have about having more money in my life?
  17. What judgments do I make about people that have lots of money?
  18. What judgments do I make about people that are severely in debt?
  19. What judgments do I make about people who live from pay-check to pay-check?
  20. What judgments do I make about people who are in similar financial situations as mine?
  21. What judgments do I make about able-bodied adults who depend on others for their survival?
  22. How do my thoughts about money impact the people I care about?
  23. What scares me most about being rich/wealthy?
  24. What scares me most about being poor/broke?
  25. When do I feel the wealthiest?
  26. What could I do to feel this feeling more often?
  27. How could I amplify this feeling even if the circumstances elude me?
  28. When do I feel most in need financially?
  29. What can I do in my power to I lessen feelings of financial neediness and turn them around?
  30. How do I feel that money impacts my life in a positive way?
  31. How do I feel that money impacts my life in a negative way?
  32. How would I most like to feel about money on a regular basis?
  33. If my child(ren) grow up to experience money the way I have, will I be proud of the example that I have left them?
  34. If my grandchildren were to inherit my debts how wealthy would they be?
  35. What do I think about people who are rich or wealthy?
  36. In what ways do I identify with people who are rich or wealthy?
  37. In what ways do I identify with people who are poor or broke?
  38. In what ways do I identify with people who are breaking even?
  39. How much money would I like to make per year?
  40. How much money do I believe I deserve to make per year?
  41. What would that amount of money allow me to do/be/have?
  42. What would I still be unable to afford having made the dollar amount that I stated?
  43. How much money do I feel is too much to make for the service I give?
  44. If money were no object, how else would I like to be of service?
  45. If money were no object, what else would I do to take care of myself?
  46. If money were no object, what else would I do to take care of the people who I care most about?
  47. If I were to die today, what would I have to put in place so that others won’t have to worry about the financial cost of sorting out my affairs?
  48. How would my social work practice improve if I weren’t worried about money?
  49. What could happen if I don’t improve my attitudes about and relationship with money?
  50. What could happen if I do take steps to improve my attitudes about and relationship with money?
  51. What would I have to start doing today to begin to change my attitudes about money and the trajectory of my financial future?
  52. If I were to write a book based on my knowledge of money, wealth creation, income, cash flow, and investing, what would the title of my book be?
  53. How many pages would by book be and who would I most want to read it?
  54. Who would I have to enlist to help me co-author or edit my book so that it becomes a best-seller?
  55. What has my attitude toward money and income ability cost me so far?
  56. If I continue with the attitude that I currently have about money and my ability to increase my income, what will it cost me in the future?
  57. If I decide to improve my attitude about money and my ability to increase my income, what can I gain?
  58. If I decide to improve my attitude about money and my ability to increase my income, what benefits will my family gain?
  59. If I decide to improve my attitude about money and my ability to increase my income, what will my clients gain?
  60. What would I be willing to give up to improve my income for myself and my family?
  61. Who would I need to become to have the income and life that I most desire for myself and my family?
  62. What role models can I seek out to emulate in order to model the lifestyle that I most desire?
  63. What books can I read to help me increase my income and my impact?
  64. What choices do I need to make right now that will impact my quality of life in 1 year?
  65. What choices do I need to make right now that will impact my quality of life in 5 years?
  66. What choices do I need to make right now that will impact my quality of life in 10 years?
  67. What choices do I need to make right now that will impact my quality of life in 12 years?
  68. What do I want my legacy to be when it comes to money and debt?
  69. How will my personal growth around the subject of money improve my social work practice?

Just the Beginning

Wooah! If you made it to the end of the post then congratulations to you, my friend! You are definitely a on the path to doing great things in your profession, and probably having the money you want to do them too!

Great work! This is just one example of what happens inside my online Wealth Building Master Mind Program. If you would like to learn more about the program or be informed about when the next group begins, you can sign up for the waiting list at evaforde.com/mastermind.

And if you’d like a free PDF download of the 69 Questions plus 8 Bonus questions, you can use this link to make it yours.

Oh, and if you’ve found this post insightful, why not pass it on to your colleagues and friends? They’ll be glad you did!

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